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Quest :: Week of September 7


When we take time to look at this amazing world God made, we are filled with awe and wonder. It’s that feeling of wonder we want children to have as they learn about God’s creation. We are going to do a lot of counting together this month — one, two, three, four, five, six, seven — pausing to learn what God made on each day of creation. Through our fun and exciting activities and stories, we want our preschoolers to learn God made everything, and IT IS GOOD! 

This weekend, we learned that God made the land, plants, and sea on the third day of creation.

This week, go on a hike with your child. (Walking in the backyard totally counts.) As you walk, talk about how God made the land — the big mountains, prairies filled with grass, deserts of sand — God made it all! Then, ask your child which is their favorite and why.


Quest :: September Parent Cue Article

When my daughter was ten, I told her that I would write her a story.

I write for a living and I’m constantly reading about other authors who do that. On a whim, they write their kids a story and then voila, Harry Potter!

I wasn’t going to write her the story because I thought it would turn into a book. I was going to write her a story because it’s fun. As soon as I told her that though, she said, “Sure you will. You’ll write two pages and then quit.”

Body blow!

No one hits as hard as your kids can hit.

In that simple statement, my daughter revealed that when it comes to my ability to keep my word on projects, she has her doubts.

I tend to be a starter. I am enthusiastic and excited at the beginning, but I tend to fizzle at the end. Apparently, McRae had watched that happen and was unsure if I would keep my word.

That’s a trust issue and there are three things we parents need to remember:

1. Trust is built when words become actions.

When you do what you say, you build trust. When you don’t, you destroy it. It’s that simple.

2. Trust is small and slow.

Trust is a thousand tiny actions built up over time. One by one. Day by day. It’s not a home run moment, it’s showing up in small ways consistently.

3. Trust can be rebuilt.

McRae knows I won’t forget her at soccer practice. She knows I’ll take her for ice cream when I say. Her comment revealed she didn’t trust me when it came to writing, but even that can be rebuilt. It is not lost.

Trust is like the glue in parenting, it tends to hold your whole relationship with your child together.

For more blog posts and parenting resources, visit ParentCue.org.


Safari :: September Parent Cue Article

I was always extremely skinny as a child. Adults would consistently make jokes about my size. They referred to me as a “string bean,” said I was “nothing but skin and bones” and “25 pounds soaking wet.” One windy day, I remember an adult telling me I needed to put rocks in my coat pockets to weigh me down so the wind would not blow me away. I didn’t think the joke was funny and was highly offended. I remember hearing my mother say, “I’d love to have a body like that, wouldn’t you?” That was my mother’s way of protecting me from the criticism of others and affirming the unique way God created me. She consistently did this in the company of others and in the privacy of our home.

As early as I can remember, my mother intentionally planted seeds of confidence with hopes they would one day bloom into an indestructible positive self-image. She did this because she knew that as we grew, we would be exposed to a world of judgment and criticism. And we needed to have the internal tools to face the good and the bad it would bring. For me, the bad that life brought was found in how adults freely made fun of my size.

Now, as a parent, I look at my beautiful children and see the unique way God has created each of them. And like my mother, I want to instill a positive self-image that will become their absolute truth. A positive self-image that potentially withstands bullying, the changes of puberty, and all other things life inevitably brings.

Sometimes as parents, we attempt to teach our children humility, but that can come at the expense of a positive self-image and self-esteem. But when we affirm a child as they’re developing their understanding of self, their internal toolbox is expanded. They not only have an ingrained truth but also language to combat any opposing ideas that oat their way.

No matter your child’s age, tell them just how beautiful or handsome they are. They need to hear how their unique features enhance their beauty and don’t take away from it. While your words might be ignored, the seeds being planted will take root somewhere. And if consistently watered, will produce ripe fruit. This ripe fruit of self-love, self-confidence, and self-esteem will be feasted upon for years to come.

For more blog posts and parenting resources, visit ParentCue.org.


Quest :: Week of August 31


When we take time to look at this amazing world God made, we are filled with awe and wonder. It’s that feeling of wonder we want children to have as they learn about God’s creation. We are going to do a lot of counting together this month — one, two, three, four, five, six, seven — pausing to learn what God made on each day of creation. Through our fun and exciting activities and stories, we want our preschoolers to learn God made everything, and IT IS GOOD! 

This weekend, we learned that God made everything! On the first day of creation, God made the light and dark. On the second day of creation, God made the sky and water.

This week, cuddle with your child and pray, “Dear God, thank You for making the light so we can go outside and play. Thank You for making the dark to help us sleep at night. You are the best, and we love You very much. In Jesus’ name, amen.”


Quest :: Week of August 24


The teachings in the Bible are worth more to us — are more valuable in this life — than thousands of pieces of gold and silver. At the end of the day, learning how God, our Creator, wants us to live is worth way more than anything money can buy. So grab a Bible and get ready — we’re going on a treasure hunt! We want to begin to uncover some nuggets of truth and set our preschoolers on a lifelong search for treasure — the kind of treasure that is better than gold.

This weekend, we learned about the time Jesus told the story about a man who built bigger barns for all his grain instead of sharing it with others.

As you drive this week, go on a treasure hunt. Call out something you see and encourage your child to find it. When they find it, talk about why you think it’s a treasure. After the activity, say, “The Bible is better than any treasure, because it teaches us that Jesus is alive and wants to be our friend forever.”